Characteristics of BIM

In this article, I will highlight some characteristics of BIM to give you a flavour of what features and aspects are contained within the BIM ecosystem.

BIM is an information management system used throughout construction to enable multi-disciplinary teams to work together in digital environments.

BIM is an information management system used throughout construction to enable multi-disciplinary teams to work together in digital environments. It’s used by all disciplines involved in the construction process, from architects and engineers to subcontractors and suppliers.

BIM is about more than just creating 3D models of buildings—it allows you to share information, collaborate with other people, and create digital representations of physical and functional characteristics of places.

BIM models are created using software and hardware to generate digital representations of the physical and functional characteristics of places.

BIM models are created using software and hardware. BIM models are created to generate digital representations of physical and functional characteristics of places.

BIM models are created by manufacturers and then placed into a central online library according to the relevant product classification standard (often known as classification codes).

The BIM model is built from various digital components, called objects, like walls, doors, windows and other 3D elements.

The BIM model is built from various digital components, called objects, like walls, doors, windows and other 3D elements.

Objects can be used to represent physical or functional characteristics of a building. They are created by manufacturers and then placed into a central online library according to the relevant product classification standard.

A single object can be used many times within the same BIM model, to produce a sense of realism within the project.

A single BIM object can be used many times within the same BIM model, and this is a key factor in creating a sense of realism. A particular building component may be used to represent several buildings on site. If you are modeling an office block, for example, you might use the same door for each office door in the model. Each space is unique but the door remains identical; so you can use it over and over again without needing to change anything about it or create multiple doors from scratch.

So what does this mean when it comes to collaboration? In short: everything! The ability to reuse objects means that once you’ve created something in your own project team’s private model (like a piece of furniture), anyone else working on another project can take advantage of it too—even if they’re using another software package such as Revit or Vectorworks Designer.

Each object contains data, or parameters, as well as geometric information required by the modelling software.

Each object contains data, or parameters, as well as geometric information required by the modelling software. The type of objects included in a model is determined by its purpose. For example, if you are building a house, you may want to include walls and windows but not furniture.

If your intent with BIM is to create a 3D model for analysis purposes, then it’s only necessary to include objects with geometric information (elements) such as walls and ceilings. You can define the properties of these elements using parameters:

  • How far away from other elements will they be placed?
  • How long are they?
  • What colour do they have?

Objects in a BIM model also include relationship data defining how they relate to other objects within the model.

Objects in a BIM model also include relationship data defining how they relate to other objects within the model. For example, an object’s location in a building might be defined by its relationship to other objects, such as walls and doors. This information can be used for many purposes including:

  • Creating schedules for different phases of construction
  • Generating reports about the project
  • Generating bills for services

The objects are created by manufacturers and then placed into a central online library according to the relevant product classification standard (often known as classification codes).

The objects are created by manufacturers and then placed into a central online library according to the relevant product classification standard (often known as classification codes). This provides an efficient way of providing users with access to BIM data, as it enables them to search for products using keywords.

The creation of these libraries involves careful management of its contents; when adding new objects into the library, it needs to be ensured that they have been classified correctly so that they can be easily found by those searching for them.

Conclusion

We hope that this article has given you a basic understanding of BIM and its many characteristics. Building information modelling is an exciting technology with enormous potential for improving the way we build and manage our cities. I’m excited about the future and look forward to seeing how BIM will continue to evolve as it becomes more popular

Published by

Bhavesh Ramburn

Commercial Manager - Quantity Surveyor with 10+ years in the construction industry.

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